Tag Archives: cup

gerra

Two-handled urn

Inventory number: PC13-2130-5
Name of the object: two-handled urn
Material: ceramic
Production: common
Type: crockery
Shape: indeterminate
Dimensions (cm): height: 21.7; maximum diameter: 15.2; maximum edge diameter: 12
Chronology: late Roman Republic period
Survey: July 2013
Provenance: sector 10
Description: Container designed to contain and transport liquids. The remains of white slip appear to be preserved on the exterior walls, although this has been lost from most of the surface.
Its shape is reminiscent of some of the Catalan slipware urns indigenous to the Emporitan area, although it is smaller and those pieces are not generally found beyond the Maresme and Roussillon plain. The similarity probably stems from common knowledge based around the the Iberian substratum.

OD_539

Sling projectile

Inventory number: PC10-2005-539
Name of the object: Sling projectile
Material: metal, lead.
Type: weaponry
Shape: bi-conical Type 2b of Völling (1990)
Dimensions: length: 4,1 cm, width: 1,6 cm, weight: 45 gr
Chronology: s. I BC.
Survey: july 2010
Provenance: sector 2.
Description: Lead sling projectile made in a two-part mould. One end is crushed and it has an incision on one side. This damage could be the result of impacting against a hard surface. Lead sling projectiles originated in the Greek world, where they are documented for the first time at the end of the 5th century BC. It seems that they started to spread following Roman expansion and, during the Roman Republican and Imperial Periods, they are documented throughout the Mediterranean

OD_190

Sharpening stone or coticule

Inventory number: PC10-101-190
Name of the object: Sharpening stone or coticule
Material: lithic, basalt.
Type: daily use object
Shape: rectangular
Dimensions: 6 x 4 cm. Thickness: 1 cm.
Chronology: Roman Late Republic
Survey: july 2010
Provenance: SUPI 4.
Description: Rectangular sharpening stone, touchstone or coticule of basaltic tuff with bevelled edges

OD_516

Door key

Inventory number: PC10-2005-516
Name of the object: door key
Material: metal, iron
Type: daily use object
Dimensions: length (from the spikes to the outer part of the handle): 5 cm. length (from the spikes to the inner part of the handle): 4,7 cm. Irregular thickness (of the spikes): de 0,4 a 0,6 cm. Thickness (of the square handle): 0,7 x 1,2 cm. diametre of the ring: outer: 2,4 cm; inner: 1,5 cm.
Chronology: Roman Late Republic
Survey: july 2010
Provenance: sector 2
Description: Door key with four teeth, a short handle and a bow. Some of the teeth are slightly at an angle, which could have been caused in ancient times or due to the weight of the earth. The bow is large enough to carry it on one finger.

OD_508

Head of catapult bolt

Inventory number: PC10-2005-508
Name of the object: head of a pilum catapultarium
Material: metal, iron
Type: weaponry
Dimensions: total length: 10,3cm; length of the body:7,1cm; length of the head: 3,2 cm. irregular diametre of the body: from 1,8 cm at the openeing, to 1,1 cm where the head starts. Maximum width at the base of the head: 1,6 cm. Weight: 60gr.
Chronology: Roman Late Republic
Survey: july 2010
Provenance: sector 2
Description: Square-sectioned compact, solid pilum catapultarium bolt with socket attachment to the shaft. Catapult bolts could be a very effective weapon for eliminating the defenders of a wall in a hypothetical siege.

OD_191

Hilt of a bidiscoidal dagger

Inventory number: PC10-101-191
Name of the object: hilt of a bidiscoidal dagger
Material: metal, iron
Type: weaponry
Shape: bidiscoidal
Dimensions: length: 12cm maximum diametre: 6cm
Chronology: Roman Late Republic
Survey: july 2010
Provenance: SUPI 4
Description: Hilt of a bidiscoidal dagger still with the rivets that joined the two parts together. The blade has been lost. Using X-rays, it has been possible to see that the dagger had bronze decorations in the areas close to the rivets on the discs.

OD_120

Black burnished ceramic plate from Cales repaired with staples

Inventory number: PC12-2084-120
Name of the object: plate reparaired with lead staples
Material: ceramic
Production: black burnish from Cales.
Type: ware
Shape: Lamb. 5/7.
Dimensions: diametre of 33cm
Chronology: 125-25 BC
Survey: julyl 2012
Provenance: sector 7
Description: Large black glazed plate or dish from Cales. This is an important item of tableware and is of some value. They are considered luxury products imitating the gold, silver or bronze tableware that not everyone could afford.

OD_72

Pruner

Inventory number: PC13-2130-OC72
Name of the object: Pruner
Material: metal, iron
Type: tool
Dimensions: maximum length: 18,5 cm; width: 2,7 cm; thickness: 0,4cm.
Chronology: Roman Late Republic
Survey: july 2013
Provenance: sector 10
Description: Small scythe or billhook located in a domestic context. This type of small scythe or pruning knife are associated with work on vines or trees such as olive trees,

Panel 1. The archaeological site of Puig Ciutat

Where is it?

The archaeological site of Puig Ciutat is located in the municipal district of Oristà (Barcelona province). The archaeological site is currently located at the top of an elevated plain 526 metres (1,700 ft) above sea level. It covers a surface area of 5.1 hectares (12.6 acres), distributed over farmland and steeply sloping areas.

02_P1_eng_01

The hill is surrounded by two watercourses, the river Gavarresa and one of its affluents, the river Olost, which make the site very valuable from a defensive and strategic point of view.

05_P1_eng_02

What is its historical context?

Research has revealed archaeological evidence of different chronological phases that go from the Late Bronze Age or Early Iron Age to the Late Roman Republican Period (mid-1st century BC).

Most of the information we have at the moment relates to the late Roman Republican period. At that time, Puig Ciutat could have played a role as a garrison or military camp (praesidium). At the end of this period Rome’s Civil War between Julius Caesar and followers of Gnaeus Pompeius took place (BC 49 – 44).

08_P1_eng_03

How can we visit?

So far only a small part of the Puig Ciutat site has been excavated. The rest of the site is still buried. Two routes have been set up for visiting the consolidated remains:

1) A tour of the interior of the site: there are five information panels describing the settlement during the Late Republican Roman Period. The panels have QR codes to complement and enlarge on the information.

2) A tour of the site surroundings: provides a picture of the surrounding area and describes the geographical and natural conditions of Puig Ciutat.

Panel 2. Puig Ciutat: the city wall

Was Puig Ciutat a strategic control point?

The location of the settlement makes it very valuable from a defensive and strategic point of view as access is only by two natural routes to the north and south. However, the poor long-distance visibility might have made it necessary to have several control points in the vicinity.

In two of the excavated areas a city wall from the Late Roman Republican Period was discovered.

The section of wall described in this panel is not currently visible. Until it has been consolidated, it has been covered over again to ensure its conservation.

11_P2_eng_01

Where was the way in?

The archaeological excavations suggest that the wall bordered the settlement on the east and south sides of the hill.

It’s difficult to know the exact location of the gates in the wall, on account of its eroded state. However, certain clues suggest the presence of a gate on the south-east flank of the site.

How did they get in?

The excavation has revealed a rectangular construction located inside the wall.

Its purpose and date are unknown to us. It has a small, sealed entrance that could have been a second way into the settlement.

Who were they defending themselves from?

Roman military remains have been found in different parts of the site and its vicinity. This suggests a siege by Roman troops established in camps around the settlement.

It’s therefore believed that there could have been a confrontation between Romans.